What We Do

Our mission is to prevent perfectly good food from entering the waste stream by redirecting it to those who are experiencing food insecurity.

Our model of food recovery and redistribution not only enables access to healthy food, but it allows us to bring food to where people already are—overcoming barriers to food access like transportation and time.

We believe that:

Good food belongs to people, not landfills.

40% of food that is produced is wasted.

Everyone has a right to healthy food.

1 in 8 people goes hungry every day.

Everyone deserves to feel seen, heard & appreciated.

Regardless of socioeconomic status or any barriers to achieving a happy, healthy life.

We commit to:

  • Dignity
  • Continuous learning
  • Partnership
  • Innovation
  • Teamwork

We work to address the disconnect between the fact that we waste 40% of our food while 1 in 8 people are hungry.

  • We partner with food retailers, volunteer drivers, and nonprofit organizations to connect surplus food with individuals and families who are experiencing food insecurity. With the help of 2 trucks, 1 van, and thousands of volunteers who we call Food Rescue Heroes, we are able to rescue perfectly good but unsellable food that would otherwise be wasted and redirect it to people who need it.
  • Our food donor partners range from grocery stores, wholesalers, caterers, and everything in between. Our nonprofit partners include housing authorities, daycare centers, churches, community centers, and more.
  • Our model of food recovery and redistribution not only enables access to healthy food, but it allows us to bring food to where people already are – overcoming barriers to food access like transportation and time. 87% of the food we rescue is fresh food; primarily produce, meat, dairy, bread, and more.

While food rescue is the core element of our work, we also do other awesome things (if we do say so ourselves).

Our Story

Way back in February 2015, we confronted a big question: how is it possible that we are throwing mass amounts of perfectly good food into the landfill—about 40% of all food produced—while 1 in 8 people are hungry? We were born to address this disconnect—this moral problem—between surplus food, hunger, and environmental sustainability.

Since the beginning, our work has been rooted in the profound power of people creating lasting social change. Humans are inherently wired to do good. And we just need to be given the chance to show it. That’s why we started mobilizing volunteers via social media, which allowed us to cultivate a strong digital community (with varying levels of selfie skills) from the start.

We watched in sheer amazement as volunteers—both new and familiar—shared their experiences with their own networks. Cue the chain reaction. We knew we were on to something special. Today, the Pittsburgh area has the largest volunteer-led food transport network in a single urban region.

Food Rescue Hero

This network has been made possible by the development of a technology platform and mobile app called Food Rescue Hero, which we launched in November 2016. As of February 2020, it has been downloaded by nearly 10,000 individuals in Pittsburgh.

Food Rescue Hero is currently used in nearly 10 cities across the country and our goal is to support the launch of it in 100 cities by 2030.